Gourmet Spanish Food Jamon, SPanish Cured Ham Paella Supplies Ceramics and Cookware for Kitchen & Table Spanish Winex Gifts New Products Sale Items
Banner Promotion


TOOLBOX

  • Español
  • Print Page
  • Email to a Friend

Home / Reference / Reflections on Spain / April, 2013

Reflections on Spain

Feria de Abril! A Family Fiesta

Imagine any city in America completely closing down for a weeklong party. That is exactly what happens in Sevilla, as the city’s families gather along the banks of the Guadalquivir River to celebrate the coming of spring. It is the Feria de Abril, Spain's biggest party!

The feria is all about reconnecting with family during this the most beautiful season of the year. Sevilla is a magical place in the spring and early summer. Bowers of bougainvillea cascade over enclosures and sweet aromas from the jasmine vines, oranges and lemons waft in the air.

The fair ground is located in the Triana barrio of Sevilla. In earlier times, it was the site of the famous agricultural horse fair where some of the finest Andalucian horses were traded. Some of these legendary horses shared the same bloodline as those in the Royal Andalucian School of Equestrian Art in Jerez de la Frontera and the Spanish Riding School of Vienna.

Now it is purely a spring fair, but what a fantastic fair it is! Each year an extravagant gateway is built to welcome the families of Sevilla as they erect an amazing tent-city of individual casetas. Each tent is a gathering site hosted by a family to entertain friends and extended family members.

Many of the people of Sevilla were seriously involved in the Lenten devotion less than a month before; but now the rigors of Semana Santa are a fleeting memory. The members of the brotherhoods have returned the religious pasos to their resting places in local parishes, until the beginning of Holy Week the next year. If Easter is late enough in the year, the streets and patios of Sevilla will be lined with flowering citrus. The street sweepers gather the bounty of ripe oranges that have fallen to the ground from the trees that line the streets.

Now it is time to enjoy visits with the whole family in the casetas. Within each enclosure, it is a time to catch up on the latest news from an out of town cousin or aunt, or to spend time with parents, brothers and sisters, as well as hang out with your favorite friends. In one caseta, you might find a flamenco guitarist playing and singing, while all ages of the extended family are dancing together.

Of course, since it is Spain, the bar at the back of each caseta features a portable kitchen serving a cornucopia of delightful tapas: simmering garlic shrimp served with picos bread sticks; boquerones fritos; glistening slivers of Jamón Ibérico; langostinos; fresh cracked olives; Manchego cheese and almonds.

Visiting casetas is not a casual affair, it is not something to take lightly. If you are married, it involves dressing up meticulously and spending several hours in each of the four casetas that represent the four branches of your family. If I were a native of Sevilla, I would visit the people on my mother’s side in their family caseta, and then my father’s brothers and sisters. Then my wife’s side of the family, which is two more sets of relations! Finally, there would be time with my good friends and neighbors.

This is a joyful event in which time is never a concern: good conversations, tasty food, wonderful reunions with people you care for -- what more can you ask for? But remember, in Spain you do not just exchange pleasantries; you become involved with the person, trading the latest family news over delicious tapas, Manzanilla sherry and beer. That is a lot of people to visit – you can see why a week is allotted for the affair.

Then there is the ceremonial aspect to the Feria de Abril. Most women set aside their street clothes and don festive feria dresses -- mostly with bright colored polka dots and flamboyant flounces. The dresses can become quite elaborate creations with much fitting and stitching costing hundreds of dollars, and often only worn for one year, since the fashions change for every feria! Whether you are rich or poor, the dresses are a part of the fun.

When I say that women wear these dresses, I am not referring only to the young dark eyed beauties (and there are many of them). I am also referring to older women who are at least as exuberant dancers of the Sevillana as their daughters and granddaughters. They are refreshingly unashamed of their lost youth -- they are at the feria to have a good time.

I remember seeing horse drawn carriages in which there were a group of housewives having the time of their lives in their feria dresses, with a glass of sherry in hand! Until 8:00 PM, families in horse drawn carriages promenade down the unpaved avenues outside the hundreds of family casetas. Some of the carriages even sport drivers and footmen in traditional dress. As they pass down the broad esplanades, I find it fun to admire the pageantry of a long ago era. It is reminiscent of the antebellum South in America, with their beautiful ladies in their hoop skirts.

When I think back on the feria in Sevilla, I picture magnificent Andalucian horses mounted with handsome caballeros and señoritas. The young men sit erect in their saddles, wearing broad brimmed black hats and gray vests and the strikingly beautiful young ladies are casually riding pillion behind their men.

I know the picture of it sounds so terribly romantic -- of course it does, and that is because it is fact. My most precious recollections are the sight of children, mostly little girls in flamenco dresses, perfecting their Sevillana technique with each other. Some were under four years old! You can be sure that the admiring grandparents are close by.

Lest you get caught up only in the romance, remember that the feria is a vast family reunion, not a tourist event. If you did not know anyone with a family caseta, you will only experience the feria looking in from the outside. These family gatherings are all about the social fabric of Sevilla, so in order to attend you will need to be the guest of one of the families.

The closest event I can think of in the United States is Thanksgiving Day and perhaps Christmas Eve. Our families gather around these holidays. But ours is a different culture due to the vastness of our nation. It is not unusual for some families to be scattered over thousands of miles. It would take more than twelve hours driving for me to see my brother, or for my wife Ruth to see her brother and sister. I know of one person who flies from Virginia to Alaska to see her grandchildren!

In Sevilla the key is proximity, where families see each other many times a month, and they may have lived in the same neighborhood for all of their lives. They have friendships with others that stretch back to early childhood. The weeklong Feria de Abril is something the residents of Sevilla can count on as part of the rhythm of their lives.

Saludos,

Don

+ Add a Comment

COMMENTS

"I was born in Sevilla and lived in that beautiful city half of my life, I just want tp comment that your article of Feria of Sevilla is fantastic and very truly thanks for keeping our Spanish culture alive!

Sincerely,
A "Sevillana" in South Eastern Missouri"
Conchita, Missouri

"Sevilla is quite a wonderful place -- so full of flowers, I like the cathedral a lot with its gold raridos altarpiece -- although it was covered this year while it was being repaired. Columbus' grave is another dramatic feature. I know it is heresy, but in many ways I like the Alcázar better than the Alhambra in the sense that there are not so many tourists and tour buses. I understand that they are designed by the same architect. You have a chance to linger away from the crowd among the amazing number of flowers and fountains." - Don Harris

Featured Products:

2 Packages of Magdalenas Breakfast Muffins

2 Packages of Magdalenas Breakfast Muffins
Made with Olive Oil
Rated 4.5 Stars

SHIPS FOR FLAT RATE
$14.95 CO-46-2
Add This Item to Your Cart
2 Packages of Tortillitas de Camarones - Crispy Shrimp Pancakes

2 Packages of Tortillitas de Camarones - Crispy Shrimp Pancakes
An Andalucian Favorite
All Natural

$24.95 SE-116-2 Perishable Product
SALE PRICE: $19.95
Add This Item to Your Cart
Señorío de Vizcántar Special Selection Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Señorío de Vizcántar Special Selection Extra Virgin Olive Oil
Our Best Seller - Award Winning
All Natural
Rated 4.5 Stars

SHIPS FOR FLAT RATE
$19.95 OO-45
Add This Item to Your Cart


Reflexiones en Español

Read in English
Feria de Abril! Una Fiesta Familiar

Imagínense que cualquier ciudad de los EEUU cerrase por completo para celebrar una fiesta que durara toda una semana. Esto es exactamente lo que sucede en Sevilla cuando las familias de la ciudad se reúnen a orillas del río Guadalquivir para celebrar la llegada de la primavera. Se trata de la Feria de Abril, la fiesta más grande de España.

La Feria es en esencia volver a conectar con la familia durante la época más bonita del año. Sevilla es un lugar mágico durante la primavera y a principios de verano con sus enramadas de buganvillas cayendo en cascada sobre las tapias, el dulce aroma del jazmín, el olor a naranja y a limón en el aire…

El ferial está situado en el barrio sevillano de Triana. En otros tiempos, en este recinto tenía lugar la famosa Feria de Ganado en la que se comerciaba con algunos de los mejores ejemplares de caballo andaluz. Algunos de estos equinos legendarios tenían el mismo linaje que el de los de la Real Escuela Andaluza del Arte Ecuestre de Jerez de la Frontera y de aquellos de la Escuela Española de Equitación de Viena.

Hoy en día es esencialmente una feria de primavera, pero ¡ Qué feria tan fantástica! Cada año se construye una original portada para dar la bienvenida a las familias sevillanas a medida que van erigiendo una impresionante ciudad de carpas formada por casetas individuales. Cada caseta es un punto de encuentro organizado por una familia para invitar a sus amigos y parientes.

Hace menos de un mes, muchos de estos sevillanos estaban participando activamente de la cuaresma; pero ahora los rigores de la Semana Santa son un recuerdo fugaz. Los miembros de las hermandades ya han devuelto los pasos a sus lugares respectivos en sus parroquias locales hasta el comienzo de la Semana Santa del año próximo. Si la Semana Santa cae lo suficientemente tarde, las calles y los patios de Sevilla están repletos de cítricos que florecen. Los barrenderos recogen del suelo un botín de naranjas maduras que han caído de los arboles que bordean las calles.

Ahora toca disfrutar con toda la familia en las casetas. En cada recinto, es hora de ponerse al día de las últimas noticias familiares de algún primo o tía que viven fuera de la ciudad o de pasar el tiempo con los padres, hermanos y hermanas, además de compartir con los amigos más cercanos. En una caseta, uno puede encontrarse con un guitarrista flamenco tocando y cantando mientras miembros de la familia de todas las edades bailan juntos.

Por supuesto, y tratándose de España, la barra que hay al fondo de cada caseta cuenta con una cocina portátil de la que salen en abundancia maravillosas tapas: gambas al ajillo servidas con picos (colines), boquerones fritos, relucientes lonchas de jamón ibérico, langostinos, aceitunas rajadas, queso manchego y almendras.

Visitar las casetas no es un tema trivial, no es algo que se pueda tomar a la ligera. Si uno está casado, la visita a la feria supone acicalarse meticulosamente y pasar varios horas en cada una de las cuatro casetas que representan a las cuatro ramas de la familia de uno. Si yo fuese de Sevilla, tendría que visitar a mis familiares por parte de madre en su caseta y luego a los de mi padre en la suya. Luego le tocaría el turno a la familia de mi mujer, lo que supondría otras dos visitas más. Más tarde, habría que sacar tiempo para mis amigos y vecinos. Se trata siempre de una acontecimiento alegre en el que el tiempo nunca es un problema: buena conversación, comida sabrosa, estar rodeado de la gente que te importa ¿Qué más se puede pedir? Pero recuerden, en España, uno no se limita a intercambiar cumplidos; uno se involucra con la persona, intercambiando las últimas noticias familiares mientras se disfruta de deliciosas tapas, manzanilla y cerveza. Como ven, hay mucha gente a la que visitar, de ahí que se disponga de toda una semana para hacerlo.

Luego está la parte ceremonial de la Feria de Abril. La mayoría de las mujeres dejan a un lado su ropa de calle y lucen alegres vestidos de feria – la mayoría en colores brillantes, con lunares y vistosos volantes. Estos vestidos puede llegar a ser diseños muy elaborados que cuestan cientos de dólares y que a menudo sólo se usan un año ya que la moda cambia con cada feria. Independientemente del dinero que se tenga, los vestidos son parte de la diversión.

Cuando digo que cada mujer lleva uno, no me refiero sólo a la jóvenes bellezas de ojos oscuros (y de esas hay muchas). Me refiero también a señoras mayores que nada tienen que envidiar a sus hijas y nietas a la hora de bailar sevillanas. La juventud perdida no supone ningún impedimento, están totalmente desinhibidas, estas señoras van a la feria a pasárselo bien.

Recuerdo haber visto calesas tiradas por caballos en las que iban montadas un grupo de amas de casa pasándoselo de miedo, todas ellas ataviadas con sus trajes de flamenca y con una vaso de jerez en la mano. Hasta las ocho de la tarde las familias pueden pasearse en calesas tiradas por caballos por las avenidas de tierra que rodean los cientos de casetas familiares. Algunos de estos coches de caballos cuentan con conductores y lacayos engalanados con trajes tradicionales. Según van pasando por las explanadas, me parece divertido poder admirar la pompa y el boato de una época pasada. Todo ello me evoca al sur de los EEUU de la época de antes de la Guerra, a las bellezas sureñas y a sus faldas con cancán.

Cada vez que pienso en la Feria de Sevilla, me vienen a la mente magníficos caballos andaluces montados por atractivos caballeros y señoritas. Los jóvenes jinetes sentados bien rectos en sus monturas, llevando sus sombreros negros de ala ancha y sus chalecos grises, va acompañados por jovencitas de belleza impresionante que van sentadas detrás de ellos.

Sé que este retrato suena enormemente romántico pero es que la realidad es así. Mi recuerdo más entrañable es el de los niños, especialmente el de las niñas pequeñas vestidas de gitanas practicando sus dotes de baile unas con otras. ¡Algunas de ellas tenían menos de cuatro años! Ni que decir tiene que a los abuelos, que andaban por ahí cerca, se les caía la baba.

En caso de que uno se vea atraído sólo por este lado romántico de la feria, hay que recordar que esta es una reunión familiar de grandes dimensiones, no un evento turístico. Si uno no conoce a alguien que tenga una caseta, solo podrá experimentar la feria desde fuera. Estos encuentros familiares giran únicamente en trono al tejido social de la ciudad de Sevilla, así que para tomar parte, se necesita ser el invitado de una de estas familias.

El evento más cercano a este que se me ocurre que podamos tener en los EEUU es el Día de Acción de Gracias o la Nochebuena. Nuestras familias se reúnen en estas dos ocasiones. Pero la nuestra es una cultura diferente debido a la inmensidad de nuestra nación. No es nada extraño que las familias estén diseminadas a lo largo de miles de kilómetros. Tendría que conducir más de doce horas par ver a mi hermano o para que mi esposa Ruth pudiese ver a los suyos. Sé de una persona que vuela de Virginia a Alaska para visitar a sus nietos.

En Sevilla la clave es la proximidad, gracias a la cual las familias se ven muchas veces al mes y pueden incluso haber vivido en el mismo barrio durante toda su vida. Las amistades de unos y otros se remontan a la infancia. La semana de la Feria de Abril es algo con lo que los habitantes de Sevilla cuentan y que forma parte del ritmo de sus vidas.

Saludos,

Don